#MyLeftBoob Chronicles: The Port is Placed, the Battle Begins

jugular

It’s been an eventful week so far and it’s only Tuesday! I went in for the port placement surgery on Monday, feeling prepared and ready to go…..that is, until the radiology surgeon started telling me how and where they were going to insert the port…..through my JUGULAR vein? What the???? I had never heard of that before and had NO idea they’d be doing that. You never hear anything good when people mention the jugular vein.

So, nervously, I was wheeled into the operating room. The nurses and physician’s assistants were wonderful. Apparently I was blabbing away and cracking jokes before I drifted off to sleep while they worked. When I woke up a few hours later I had the port placed and with it, a lot of pain, dizziness and nausea.

We got home and I slept for a few hours, took more pain meds, and tried to go back to sleep but I began having shortness of breath and muscle twitchiness in my legs. I called the doctor at 4 a.m. and was told to come into the emergency room.

After 2 chest x-rays, an ultrasound on my legs to check for blood clots, blood work and heart/lung tests, 5 hours later the doctor told me that I probably just had “an adverse reaction to anesthesia.” Phew!

After spending the better part of 2 days at the hospital, I go back tomorrow (Wednesday) for chemo training and start chemo treatment #1 on Thursday.

I’m trying to stay positive and focus on the good: I’m only Stage 1 and it has not spread. But I am nervous with 2 surgeries and 2 adverse reactions. Maybe 3’s a charm? Hopefully I will be fine. I believe in prayer and the power of positive thinking and am holding on to faith and hope.

Tomorrow we film more of the documentary we are working on to raise awareness and funding for Metaplastic Carcinoma. My hope is that more women can catch it early like I did by doing self breast exams and can have a better prognosis than those I’ve met thus far.

Many women who have Triple Negative Metaplastic Carcinoma don’t find it until it has progressed to Stage 3 or 4 and has spread to other places in the body. Both Triple Negative and Metaplastic have a higher chance of recurrence but since we caught mine early I am believing we will kill it for good with 4 months of chemo and 2 months of radiation.

Even when I am “done” with my treatments I am never truly done because it is something that will always need to be checked every 3-6 months for the next 7-10 years because of its higher rate of recurrence, I consider myself very lucky to have a good prognosis and that is why I feel the need to write and make this documentary so there can be more funding for research and clinical trials.

Documentary filming continues Wednesday as the team follow me to work, my office at my favorite local coffee shop. After that I’ll try on my new scarves and wigs. My Medical Oncologist tells me I can expect to lose my hair 19-20 days after the first chemo treatment on April 9 ย so I need to be prepared.

The trailer will be done soon and of course I will share here when it is completed.

To learn more about Metaplastic breast cancer, please visit http://www.metaplasticbc.com/

To support my breast cancer battle please click here.

8 Comments (+add yours?)

  1. Stephanie Klein
    Apr 10, 2015 @ 16:05:51

    Wendy, it’s so fabulous that you are keeping us all informed. As I’ve been through it I can very much relate. Metaplastic is a wicked bitch and you are doing everything right to keep it away.

    Reply

  2. Tracy Joniak (@714tracy)
    Apr 10, 2015 @ 21:13:05

    I’m a month or so behind you on what I fear is the same path. We’ve got this! We, too, are rare and aggressive.

    Reply

  3. cenri76
    Apr 11, 2015 @ 14:25:13

    Hi Wendy. I’ve been searching for your update and glad to hear you are doing well! I’m sure you are taking things one hour at a time til you find what is your chemo pattern. Keep track of your days so you know which ones you feel good and which ones you feel bad, post chemo. As for your hair, most people seem to lose it between days 14-15, not 19-20, so be ready. It happens even when you are in denial. :/

    Thank you for blogging and making a documentary on all of our behalf. I am looking forward to watching and supporting you through all of this. I admire your spirit.

    Reply

    • wendipoprockct
      Apr 11, 2015 @ 18:52:21

      Thanks! If I can help others find it early so they have a fighting chance against this nasty evil disease as I did, then it’s worth the fight! I have wigs, hats, scarves so I’m ready but thanks for the tip about losing it earlier. Head’s getting a tiny bit itchy so that makes me wonder.

      Reply

  4. bcaforwomen
    Apr 15, 2015 @ 15:03:15

    All the very best in your treatment. Thanks for educating us on metaplastic cancer.

    Reply

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