#MyLeftBoob #BreastCancer Chronicles: After-Effects of Cancer

ERE.R. visit April 6, 2017 for a pneumonia scare. No, doctor, this is not happiness to see you.

Forgive me cyberspace, for I have sinned. It’s been far too long since my last blog post but I’m happy to say that we raised $888 at our #MyLeftBoob Cancer-Free Celebration/Ann’s Place Benefit Concert in February! A HUGE thank you is going out to all the bands, donors, sponsors, volunteers and supporters who made it possible!

While I would have liked to have raised more money, I’m happy with the end result. As my beloved father-in-law used to say (God rest his soul), “It’s better than a poke in the eye!” I know that every little bit helps Ann’s Place continue to offer amazing free programs. I go whenever I can for yoga, have benefitted from reiki and therapy and am so grateful to have a place like this in my back yard.

Also since my last post, I met a woman who recently completed her treatment, learned of another who is newly diagnosed and three more who are currently going through treatment. I hope my blog can serve as a place where you/they can gain insight, comfort and support on what you will go through physically, emotionally and spiritually. And for their families and caregivers who ask me what they can do to help my answer is— just be there in whatever capacity your loved one wants. Some don’t want visitors (I didn’t), but will want to know you’re still thinking of them. I found a text or email was the best bet so as not to wake is in our odd sleeping patterns. Others might want someone more hands-on. Everyone is different— just ask!

This July will be two years since I completed 16 weeks of dose dense ACT chemotherapy, which I started two years ago this week on April 9, 2015, followed by 30 radiation treatments from August-October 2015. I started by treatment with two separate lumpectomies in February and August of 2015. (Click here to read my story from the beginning) So I “should” be feeling “normal” again by now, right? Wrong.

The biggest thing I’ve learned about cancer is:

  1. Everybody’s cancer is different, therefore everybody’s treatment is different.
  2. A cancer patient’s treatment is their choice— it’s their body— and they should not be made to feel guilty for choosing not to listen to others’ advice or home remedies.
  3. A cancer patient needs support, should take advantage of their local resources and not walk this road alone. Click here to find a support group near you.
  4. Getting cancer reveals who your true friends and family are and that some people who you think will be there for you may not be and that’s okay. There is a whole new family you’re a part of now- the WARRIOR family!
  5. Cancer happens to the whole family, and then some. Be sure that children, spouses and all those close to the patient are also getting the love and support they need.
  6. Cancer is not over when treatment ends— especially if you’ve had chemo and/or radiation. It could take months or even years to get back to “normal” and some never do. It all depends on the treatment.

While I might look “normal” to many, I’m not. I won’t use cancer as a “crutch” or an “excuse” for getting out of, or not doing things, but it’s been tough. I still don’t feel 100% and need to allow myself the right to not try to be Super Mom and/or Super Woman. I suffer from many of the long-term side effects that Cancer.net describes on their website, including constant joint pain, fatigue, pain at the surgery site, lung problems and fear of recurrence, to name just a few. I can’t lift heavy things on my left side due to the risk of lymphedema.

But I’m still here and will continue to write to raise awareness for early detection. Why not take the time right now to stop and squeeze your boobs?! It only takes a moment. It saved my life and can save yours too! Sometimes mammograms are not enough.

At this time last year I had surgery to get the chemo port placed in my chest. Today, because of another illness, I’m feeling about as weak as I was here in this photo but  now I can say that I am 100% cancer-free!  Photo: April, 2015.

port surgery

For those of you just joining me, I’m a recent survivor of a rare and aggressive type of breast cancer called Triple Negative Metaplastic Carcinoma. Triple Negative is only found in 15% of women diagnosed and it means that the tumor is estrogen receptor-negative, progesterone receptor-negative and HER2-negative. The good news is that this type of breast cancer is typically responsive to chemotherapy. Joan Lunden has a great blog that explains TNBC in detail.

Metaplastic Carcinoma is the scarier part of my diagnosis as it’s only found in 1% of women diagnosed and has a higher rate of recurrence in the bones, skin and lungs. It was only just discovered in 2000 and there has not been a lot of testing, research or clinical studies so diligent follow-up is key to me staying healthy and cancer-free. I can’t be on Tamoxifen or any other post-cancer meds because I don’t have the receptors for it. So  I describe my life now as sort of like walking a tightrope in high heels without a net. As long as I keep my chin up, stay focused on looking ahead (and don’t look down or back), I’ll be fine. Sort of. Eat clean, avoid sugar, exercise 5 times a week for 45 minutes each time, limit alcohol and try to keep stress levels down because stress is horrible for recurrence. Easy peasy! Right? Not so much….

When the “normal” stressors (work, bills, busy-ness of everyday life) get interrupted by another curveball life throws at me and my husband’s driving me to the ER at 8 p.m. to make sure I don’t have pneumonia is when I’m forced to stop dead in my tracks and remember that I can’t do everything I used to be able to do. I need to allow myself time to rest, learn to say “no” and remember not over-extend myself.

As I lay on our lumpy, 16-year-old couch battling a 3-week-long, stubborn illness that sent me to the emergency room last night, I find it hard to believe that at this time last year I was in the hospital, recovering surgery #2 of 5 to get my chemo port placed for breast cancer surgery. Glad I didn’t know they would go in through the jugular vein to place the tube that connects to the port they use to administer the chemo drugs or I might have been freaking out juuuust a little bit. Now when I get sick I say to myself— at least I’m not that sick.

Last week I went to Urgent Care because I’ve been coughing, wheezing and having a hard time breathing. For many cancer patients when new ailments arise the first thing we think of is— I hope it’s not cancer. The doc checked me out and said my lungs were clear and I was sent home with antibiotics, cough syrup, two different inhalers and nasal spray. The fever went away for a few days but the lingering fear of not knowing what was causing this sickness still haunted me.

When my temperature spiked to nearly 103 degrees last night, I called the doctor who said to go to straight to the emergency room to get a lung x-ray (which was exactly what I wanted). The Physician’s Assistant said he “thinks” it looks clear and to call back to see what the radiologist said. I asked if there were any spots on the x-rays because that’s what I was more concerned about and the PA assured me that my lungs were clear, had no black spots (cancer) but to call back later “just in case.” Pneumonia would show up white. I am putting in a call to the oncologist tomorrow too as an added precaution. Thank goodness for my husband’s insurance!

pneumonia

If looks could kill…….. (#badhairday #nomakeup #nofilter) Photo: April 6, 2017

After a few hours of waiting, the radiologist gave me the all-clear. Phew! Not cancer, not pneumonia, thankfully, yet I still lay here feeling like I got hit by a Ford F-150. I won’t say I feel like I got hit by a Mack truck because after enduring 16 weeks of dose dense red devil chemo I do know what that feels like and it’s not fun (but neither is this).

Heaped on top of battling sickness is a mountain of debt that doesn’t seem to be going away, a pile of horse-s#*t that a person who is no longer in my life keeps throwing in my face that’s consuming my time, money and energy and dealing with a huge pay cut that’s forcing me to seek out other jobs—  all adding to the stress. Volunteer work, house work, mom and wife duties and a new business launch that can’t seem to get off the ground due to lack of time and energy only adds to the pile I’m getting buried under. Oh, and then there’s this trying to lose the chemo weight battle. (Yes, you do gain weight during chemo because all you want to eat is buttery noodles, starchy bagels and other fattening carb-filled foods…at least I did).

#pitypartyendsnow

BUT I do still see a flicker of light at the end of the tunnel from a match I’m lighting myself and that’s what I’m aiming for as I crawl out of this mess.

Before I got sick, I visited Joy Ride’s beautiful Ridgefield facility  and can’t wait to get started. Spinning is the perfect exercise for me because I can’t lift anything on my left side due to the surgery and lymph node removal so any cardio, like jogging or spinning, is perfect.

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Joy Ride Ridgefield seems like such a warm and welcoming environment and I can’t wait to be a part of this community. But I can’t start yet if just walking from the couch to the kitchen gets me winded. I know this illness can’t last forever and that “this too shall pass,” I just wish it wasn’t taking so darn long! Once I get started, I will be posting several times a week about my progress so be sure to check back!

Since I had my lymph nodes removed to make sure the cancer didn’t spread (it didn’t), including my sentinel lymph node, my immune system will always be compromised so I’m assuming that’s why now when I get sick it’s much worse and takes much longer to get over.

This is supposed to be the year I do all the things I’ve always wanted to do but have been putting off like skiing for the first time in 30 years (check!), like auditioning and being the part of a community theater production (check! – more to come on that later), like starting my own Arbonne business and becoming financially independent (a work in progress- click here to read more and order!), like finishing at least one of three books in progress and sending to an editor to polish up to start pitching (half-check, also a work in progress) and like registering for my first ever 5K (double-check!).

I signed up for Run Like a Mother, a 5K that occurs annually on Mother’s Day, that’s happening in just 37 days! (but who’s counting? I am!) I’m planning on running this (at least part of the way) with my daughter Ruby, but have not felt well enough to train at all. It might be a fast walk-jog-run-pant-crawl to the finish line but I will finish the race and get my Mother’s Day rose at the finish line!

But for now the wild roller coaster ride continues and I learn to live with my “new normal,” trying not to lose my lunch on the loop-dee-loops, keep my hands in the car, seek out the good in every bad situation, find a learning moment in every challenge, surround myself with positive people, have gratitude for each day I’ve been given and learn to live in the moment.

People often ask how I’m able to keep a positive attitude and get through what I’ve been through and the answer is this— I remember how blessed I am to be a survivor and to be surrounded by such an awesome family and amazing support system. I don’t know why I am still here but some of my incredible warrior brothers and sisters are not, but I do know that as long as I am here I will be their voice through my writing.  I try to take things one day, and many times, one hour at a time, and keep fighting the good fight.

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Do you have a question about my diagnosis or treatment?

Contact me at wendyannmitchell@live.com.

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